Tag Archives: Sochi

The Most Forgettable Winter Olympics?

Perhaps some of you noticed that I didn’t blog during the 2014 Winter Olympics.  No, my computer wasn’t broken.  Nor was I tucked away somewhere without

Even I wasn't the only one yawning. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Even I wasn’t the only one yawning. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

electricity.  I just didn’t have anything to say.  And that’s not a common occurrence when it comes to the Olympics.  I love the Olympics.  It’s the most exciting thing that happens in my life every two years.  Some might wonder if this is because I have an uneventful life.  No!  It’s because I love the Olympic Games that much.  That much.

One can imagine, then, how disappointed I am over these Winter Olympics.  Okay, I’ll admit I was never particularly excited about Sochi as the host city.  But I put my feelings aside and tried to throw myself into these Olympics as I normally do.  I took vacation days to stay at home and watch.  I even woke at 2:00 AM (or earlier) to watch events live.  But for the most part, the competition was dull.  The venues were architecturally sound, but not worthy of awe.  And when it’s February but the average temperature at a Winter Olympics is 57 degrees Farenheit, something is off.

Throughout the two weeks I kept trying to find that excitement.  Aside from the pairs competition, ladies ski jumping, and the cross-country skiing, there was no sparkle.  No athletes with whom I really fell in love.  No captivating stories.

The only consistency in Sochi was NBC’s continued terrible coverage.  It’s something the network has mastered.   While it offered more live streaming online, it plastered results all over its website.  And rather than forcing me to watch on my laptop, it could have made more use of the other channels it owns.  Quite often as I watched live Olympic coverage online, USA Network was showing re-runs of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” and CNBC was airing infomercials.

The one bright spot in these games was NBC Sports’ choice of analysts for figure skating.  While Tara Lipinski  showed poise and articulated

Screenshots from my TV of Lipinski and Weir.  Oh, Johnny!

Screenshots from my TV of Lipinski and Weir. Oh, Johnny!

herself, her colleague Johnny Weir brought much-needed fun and sparkle.  I predicted Lipinski would be in Sochi, and I’m glad NBC decided to also bring Weir to Sochi.  I felt bad for those who weren’t able to watch skating during the day.  They were stuck with Scott Hamilton and Sandra Bezic for evening analysis.

Yes, it breaks my heart that these Olympics weren’t memorable.  But like any Olympian, I’m going to persevere and set my sights on the future.  I hope that Rio brings its A-game to the table in 2016.  And to Pyeongchang, let me say this:   I can’t handle another dud of a Winter Olympics.  I expect the next Winter Olympics to be phenomenal.  If you need any advice, e-mail me.  I’ve got some great ideas.

Faster, Higher, Stronger.

 

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The Power to Inspire, Unite–To Change the World

mandela flame

Photo: Reuters

Our hearts are heavy since learning of Nelson Mandela’s death yesterday.  Although old in age and having done so much to change our world, many of us are finding it difficult to say goodbye–to bid farewell to a pillar in our international community.

It is a sense of trepidation that I feel when I consider a future without Mandela.  I wonder how we will all continue to fight for equality and social justice when such an influential figure is no  longer here to inspire us.

13 years ago Mandela gave a speech in Monaco during which he spoke these powerful and unforgettable words:

“Sport has the power to change the world…it has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair. It is more powerful than government in breaking down racial barriers.”

During his 95 years, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was always learning, growing, and advocating change.  He never gave up.  Never surrendered–even when faced with countless hurdles of cruelty and injustice.  Instead, he stood firm in his quest for a world without hate, prejudice, injustice, and inequality.  His unwavering strength, courage, and passion for change is known to have inspired countless others over the decades.   Yet perhaps now–in a post-Mandela world–is when his legacy should influence us all the more.

In less than two months the 2014 Winter Olympics will open in Sochi, Russia.  These games which were designed to ensure ‘all sports for all people’ are being hosted by a country where homosexuality is banned and stories of persecution against sexual minorities are being reported.  Sochi is this century’s Berlin.  A sporting movement which Pierre de Coubertin designed to promote peace, athletics, and equality is once again being held in a country whose laws and actions directly contradict the tenets of the Olympic Movement and the late Mandela.

The torch must  now be passed on–but not from Mandela to a single heir-apparent.  Rather, shouldn’t we all collectively take the torch and vow to move forward, to do our part?    Athletes competing next year in Sochi will represent both genders, all sexual orientations, all races, and a diverse number of religions.  They–along with us, the fans–have “the power to change the world.”  Their actions, their performances, and our support of them can help inspire change.  We not only owe this to Mandela, but more importantly, we owe this to ourselves and posterity.

Faster, Higher, Stronger.

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2014 Olympic Medals Revealed

Medals

With just eight months to go until the 2014 Winter Olympic Games, Sochi’s Olympic Organizing Committee unveiled the medals which will be awarded to hundreds of athletes.

There’s a lot going on in this medal design–so much, in fact, that I’m undecided as to whether I give it a thumbs up or a thumbs down.

I’ll be writing more about the symbolism behind the design of these medals as the 2014 games get closer. For now, what is your opinion of the medal design?

Faster, Higher, Stronger.

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Future Olympics Television Coverage: My Proposal

Here's to wishful thinking....

For anyone who is more than remotely interested in the Olympics, they are probably aware of the stink over NBC’s coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics (or lack thereof).  For anyone who has read this blog, you know that I am one of the most critical voices of the network’s paltry coverage.  Multiple blogs have addressed it, folks on Twitter have Tweeted their lamentations/frustrations, and many (including yours truly) have sought shelter at Justin.tv, hoping to watch quality coverage from European TV or Canada’s CTV Sports.  Facebook has seen groups such as this one created (a group of which I’m a proud member) .   With all the complaining, NBC has yet to properly respond.  It’s as if the Queen, aka Dick Ebersol, is hiding in Scotland and we need Tony Blair (who is volunteering?) to step in and force a statement to be made to the people, and for swift reform to begin.  Immediately.

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